Review: Samsung Odyssey Sits Among The Best VR Headsets

by Ian Hamilton • January 30th, 2018

Late last year Microsoft’s partners unleashed a collection of headsets powered by the company’s tracking technology. Leading the pack with a superior resolution is Samsung’s Odyssey, which sports the same resolution (1440×1600 per eye) as the yet-to-be-released Vive Pro.

Odyssey costs more than the other Microsoft headsets, around $500 officially, and doesn’t feature the flip-up display that’s so useful to developers. For enthusiasts, the resolution bump is important. We called the Odyssey 2017s best VR hardware partly because it legitimized Microsoft’s efforts to enter the VR market after Facebook and HTC and those extra pixels are key to their effort. The other VR headsets in the Windows-based line up, like the entry-level Acer and Lenovo systems, worked well and since our initial reviews they’ve dropped to incredibly low prices. Everything in those reviews holds true with Odyssey, with a couple major changes. There’s the missing flip-up display, which is gone in favor of a more comfortable fit overall, and the addition of IPD adjustment alongside integrated sound and a microphone array. Combined with that increased resolution from Samsung’s OLEDs, it all makes a big difference in presenting Odyssey as more of a complete package.

To put it simply, to my eyes the Odyssey’s visuals improve upon Rift and Vive in every way. At CES we also tried the Vive Pro, which uses the same resolution Samsung display. It wasn’t a lot of time with the Vive Pro and we didn’t try them side by side, so it is hard to comment more about the optical differences between the two. But we are left with the overall impression that Odyssey’s clarity — from resolution to lenses — currently leads the industry. In a CES demo provided by NextVR using the Odyssey, the company showed how crisp a captured scene can look in the Odyssey. It is hard to go back to the decreased resolution after experiencing the improvement.

Microsoft’s SteamVR integration is absolutely critical to making any of the Microsoft-based systems worth the investment, because its store is still lacking lots of great content. There are popular apps like Arizona Sunshine, Superhot VR, Bigscreen, Fantastic Contraption, Space Pirate Trainer and others available on the Microsoft Store, but you’re going to want to access Steam to get some of the latest and greatest content in order to make the headset purchase worth it.

Some developers have been working to update their content so it works with lower end PCs as well as Windows-based headsets, and this list is likely to grow over time. It is important to recognize, however, that Microsoft’s SteamVR integration remains in early access and your mileage will vary depending what graphics card you have and which games you want to play. The description for the SteamVR integration says it would remain in early access until it is “stable for the majority of games and apps.” There’s no timeline yet for that to happen. This may mean you should lean toward getting a more powerful PC if you are thinking about getting an Odyssey.

It is a pain to set up cameras or laser boxes around the room with Rift and Vive. Rift also comes with a whole lot of great exclusive content on the Oculus Store, while also running most things on Steam. It isn’t an easy choice picking between Odyssey and Rift. Vive is still great for the largest setups, of course, but Odyssey is way more convenient and Rift sets itself apart with content exclusives. So Rift has access to the greatest amount of quality content (yes Vive owners can use a hack to access some Oculus content) and the Oculus hand controllers are superior, but you have to plug in three cameras to your computer to make Rift offer the same freedom as the others. The hand controllers with Odyssey are slightly more ergonomic than those with other Windows-based headsets, but overall the differences are pretty minor — they’re still a little bulky.

Final Recommendation: Worth It

Overall, the Odyssey sits among the best VR headsets on the market offering a resolution improvement not visible in a Rift or Vive today, and greater convenience in setup. With Vive Pro likely to require a hefty premium, Odyssey’s integrated audio and microphone combined with a boost to visual quality make it a tempting purchase for the near future.

Tagged with: ,

What's your reaction?
Like
Wow
8%
LOL
8%
Dislike
17%
  • Thanks for this review. I already thought it was worth. Anyway it’s a pity that it is available only in the US…

    • Ted Joseph

      I purchased on day one… If you own a Rift or Vive, you won’t be impressed…

      • Michael

        How did you get so far as to buy one and not know how to play games on it? That’s kinda upsetting that you would spread that misinformation.

        • daveinpublic

          Maybe it was more than the games that he didn’t like. Comfort is a big factor, and so it controller tracking, which seems to have enough blind spots to be distracting for many. Also, with or without Steam, Oculus funds a lot of development, so you get quality games that are new, not repetitive wave shooters and remakes of older titles.

          • Michael

            Windows MR has full access to SteamVR, so any complaints filed about this, you can file to the rest of the industry as the Vive is roughly the industry leader. Furthermore, it can also run through ReVIVE using SteamVR, but I’ve not tried.

            The controller blindspots hardly cause trouble, they cause more trouble in social games than action games if that’s any indicator.

  • mellott124

    I agree as well. Samsung Odyssey is a nice HMD. The only thing that isn’t better than other systems is tracking. It glitches more than I’d like to see. More so than Rift and definitely more than Vive. With that said, the inside-out tracking works a LOT better than I was expecting. They still did a really nice job. I’m curious to use the Odyssey with a VR backpack and see if the overall experience improves.

    Interesting you mention the visuals being better than Vive Pro. I saw the Vive Pro at CES as well and didn’t think it looked as good visually as the Odyssey, even though I knew it was the same panels. Seemed like Vive had more glare.

  • Evgeni Zharsky

    I thought the Odyssey was so great that I had to return mine.

    • Michael

      Why?

      • koenshaku

        Sounds like he was below it’s greatness and couldn’t bare it any longer.

        • polysix

          More likely he already owned a rift and couldn’t put up with lesser all round quality on the samsung (not bullet point specs which mean sweet FA if you can’t track properly or wear it for long or even interact decently due to worse controls).

          • Michael

            From what I hear, the Rift is inferior. Poor FOV, poor comfort, etc. The only good thing is controllers and controller tracking, otherwise the Rift is actually inferior in every way.

          • koenshaku

            That is because it took a year just for the controllers after the release of the product. It has been a work in progress ever since 3-4 USB cameras to do room scale. I made the mistake of recommending one to a friend early on and I had to troubleshoot one with him a bit. They have sorted out everything pretty much now, but I still think the USB cameras are a mess of a setup and wouldn’t recommend it again.

          • That’s exactly what keeps me from picking the Rift. I like what I see on it overall, but having been a systems engineer for over 20 years, I’m well aware of the strain that running several USB cams in parallel will put on a system-board, in turn dragging down system performance otherwise.

            I do think the Vive has the best tracking, as appears obvious, but it’s something that should be a licensed technology rather than a patented exclusive; the former would help the whole VR industry, while the latter only helps HTC for as long as they remain in the VR market –and over the past 3 months, there’s been rumors that they’re considering selling off their VR business *if I remember correctly, anyway –though I could have that mixed up, so don’t take that as gospel.

            What I’d like to see happen is the Vive trackers and their overall tracking tech become a licensed tech that other manufacturers can integrate as well, leaving the major differences in brands coming down to primarily design aesthetics. If this were to happen, the user could bring whatever HMD they like, and still have a consistent level of tracking accuracy, regardless. As things stand, everyone seems to be trying to reinvent the wheel (so to speak), while the Vive trackers are already a perfect standalone solution , but the technology is locked down to that one vendor’s implementation of VR to the detriment of VR as a whole –and I say that, because in the early days of VR, capitalizing around branding rather than technical standards slows progression, and introduces compatibility issues that shouldn’t otherwise exist –especially this far into human kind working with high technology…. we’ve been building technical standards bodies as far back as I can remember, yet VR’s launch into the world has landed with all the order of a court jester. The current VR manufacturers need to get together with the ISO (International Standards Organization) and ratify an ISO standard series for VR systems, above and beyond the standards used by VR’s lower level components, which already have standards of their own.

          • koenshaku

            I agree, but portable solutions like WMR are nice to have for travel grab and go situations.

          • Absolutely. On that alone, I really like the WMR concept as a whole. I’d like to see it improve significantly, but what’s on offer right now is really an excellent selection for the first generation of gear in that line. I could see going in this direction, or Vive, depending on how prices shake out over the next quarter or two.

      • Evgeni Zharsky

        Windows UI was buggy as hell and couldn’t get used to wonky tracking at times, especially on FPS games.

        • Reels Rihard

          You have to do what’s right for YOUR money. It didn’t stack up for you, thus it’s outta there.

        • Michael

          Which part of the Windows UI was failing you? Because my experience has been bug-free. It’s not featured well, but what little it has, it performs.

    • dk

      so your video card couldn’t keep up? …..also pics or it didn’t happen 😛

      • Evgeni Zharsky

        Pics of my return statement ? Sure but would you care to put a wager on it? My time has to be worth something. (Ran it on a 1070 btw)

        • dk

          DO IT …..DO IT NOW
          😛 nah jk dude
          …..going back to a video where a dude was talking about how he was trying out the new bmw 7 series and after 500km decided not to go with the contract ……it was so great he had to return it ……neat

  • Ted Joseph

    After playing with the Odyssey and Windows mixed reality for a few days, I tried the Rift again… Sadly, I cant go back to Windows MR. It feels like driving a pinto (Windows MR) vs. a Ferrari (Oculus). No exaggeration. The loss of tracking on the controllers constantly when out of view, the game library (or lack of), etc. has turned me off. I think Microsoft would have done a better job if they released a wireless version for the Xbox One, then moved to the MR on PC… I have been playing Arktika, and OrbusVR on the Rift, and I am having a blast…

    • Michael

      The game library? Are you joking? It’s on SteamVR, so… what ACTUAL complaints do you have?

      • koenshaku

        Sadly people actually looking for informed information have to deal with fanboys Ted with stupid metaphors that don’t make sense, then immediately point to Oculus exclusives.. For one if you are on a site like this and you go by a $500 on day one with just around 15-20 titles on windows store then you surprised by how the thing tracks? I didn’t even by one until steamVR support was available. Given the technology I was just surprised it offered a tracking experience that was so close to my HTC Vive as many others were. I have had some tracking issues on my desktop PC that has an integrated bluetooth adapter in the motherboard I heard buying a USB BT corrects this and making sure nothing is near the port.

        On my laptop I really don’t have many issues, does it track better than my HTC Vive? Of course not, is it good enough? Yes it is, the resolution is a pretty big deal and when you go back to your HTC Vive especially when it is connected wireless to a tpcast like mine it is a bit of an eyesore I must admit. I use them both especially when I have friends over, but if I am playing single player or watching media I tend to grab my WMR and it is no way I would purchase last gen HMDs when WMR HMDs are as cheap as they are now with higher resolution and access to a steamVR library.

        • polysix

          Tracking is VITAL for VR. That was his MAIN point.

          Resolution is nice, but without GREAT controls and GREAT tracking it’s all for nothing. Once the newness of better (and surely much needed) res wears off, you come back to the comfortable, lightweight, easy to put on/take off (one hand), best VR controllers in the world, very good tracking + amazing exclusive VR content (lone Echo which DOES play best in rift and with oculus touch) = Ferrari.

          Facebook haters are gonna hate but there’s no real competition for rift in gen 1 at £399. It’s head and shoulders above the rest in all round quality (hitting the sweet spots on every count and missing few while the others mess up badly on either lenses, focal sweetspot, tracking, content or controls.. even build quality and fault issues on vive).

          As someone who’s owned Vive and PSVR (and sold them) I *KNOW* the rift is the best (still) and an utter bargain at the price it is now.

          Nothing will touch it till true gen 2, probably rift 2 if they ever make one. Vive Pro is still janky, still has awful sweetspot and bad controllers and Samsung has glitchy tracking, average ergonomics and dogy controllers.

          YOU are the fanboy my friend, clearly. You’re biased. And it appears you’ve never even tried Rift to know how much better it is to actually use and be in, and work/play with vs VIVE. It’s night and day from ergonomics, dashboard/SDK,quality control POV. Maybe that is why you are happy with samsung? because it’s a step up from Vive (other than tracking). Next to rift it’s just another near miss.

          Obviously samsung has a lot going for it, it’s newer! You don’t think that is going to be totally eclipsed when oculus finally make a move on gen 2 and DO IT RIGHT? THey are the ONLY ones that have been doing almost everything right in gen 1 as a product and have shown patience and high quality standards to get thigns right first time while everyone else jumps into a spec race.

          Spec race won’t “win” VR and early tech is very transient. It’s about the long game. Rift is starting from a VERY healthy foundation and setting great (technical) precedents on hardware control, backend software and more.

          • Martin Shulika

            Take a deep breath my friend. Criticising someone for being fanboy, while all you did was stating your personal opinion and preferences.
            “Tracking is VITAL for VR. That was his MAIN point.” – Well … mobile headsets have sold out all (PC, PSVR) headsests combined without any form of tracking (FACT). So stating that The Rift has no competition in 1st gen. is nothing more than personal opinion. You should’ve been more specific in your comment that you were referring to PC VR HMD’s . A lot of people are saying “I want a better res” or ” I want a better FOV” or “Better controllers” or “effective wireless solution”. All these things says one thing … Everyone has different preferences , therefore there is no black and white in this market.
            Yes, I am a Vive owner, but unlike you I’m gonna be objective. I have never tried Rift, but I trust my VR buddy’s (owning both HMDs) stating that the Screen Door Effect is less in Oculus.
            About the touch controllers, it’s obvious that they’re way better thаn Vive wands (there’s no brain here). Price ? once more I can’t argue there as well. My personal (subjective) opinion here is that honestly the controllers does not bother me at all. Sure I prefer better controllers, sure I prefer better res with better FOV with untetherd solution, but it will get there and as of now I’m quite happy with what I have and make use of it. What bothers me more of anything about My Vive is that the controllers are not as strong as they should be for their price. A lot of people are complaining about that after a couple of hundrends of hours the flaws are starting to kick in. Be it the trackpad, or grip buttons etc. And the price for a replacement is way too high if you ask me. Overall price of Vive or any Vive replacement is unreasonably high.

            So, now you’re probably thinking after everything I said what’s in Vive that makes it a competition for Rift?
            1. Vive tracker
            While they are not so many things out there (except for VR GUN and tenis rackets) yet, I believe there’s a big potential in it. From full body tracking to specific items that can be tracked.
            2. Base stations 2.0
            I love football (soccer), and Fifa is the only NonVR game I am still playing since I have VR. But, with four 2.0 base stations and a couple trackers, I can make a good use of much bigger play area when they come up with some nice soccer game. And once again that’s not the limit. You can think of a lot of things to make use of the bigger play area.
            3. OFFICIAL wireless solution. While there was already a wireless solution out there for both Oculus and Vive, making an official one with intel is a big step further. We all know why “official” makes a difference.

            About WMR Headsets, I found their inside-out tracking solution very interesting. As you said it’s not ready yet for the hardcore gamers, since the tech is not perfect now, but I believe that it’s the foundation for the future VR HMDs. The lower specs needed to power WMR suggests wider “pc ready” adoption at least among people interested not so much in VR gaming.

            “THey are the ONLY ones that have been doing almost everything right in gen 1 as a product and have shown patience and high quality standards to get things right first time while everyone else jumps into a spec race.” – I already agreed with some of your positive statements about Oculus, but that sentence brings some ideas of my own …

            If Oculus had the patience to hold the release of the Rift until the touch controllers were ready as well as the 3 sensors set up with 360 degree of tracking , they could have been already far ahead HTC.

          • Martin Shulika

            Take a deep breath my friend. Criticising someone for being fanboy, while all you did was stating your personal opinion and preferences.
            “Tracking is VITAL for VR. That was his MAIN point.” – Well … mobile headsets have sold out all (PC, PSVR) headsests combined without any form of tracking (FACT). So stating that The Rift has no competition in 1st gen. is nothing more than personal opinion. You should’ve been more specific in your comment that you were referring to PC VR HMD’s . A lot of people are saying “I want a better res” or ” I want a better FOV” or “Better controllers” or “effective wireless solution”. All these things says one thing … Everyone has different preferences , therefore there is no black and white in this market.
            Yes, I am a Vive owner, but unlike you I’m gonna be objective. I have never tried Rift, but I trust my VR buddy’s (owning both HMDs) stating that the Screen Door Effect is less in Oculus.
            About the touch controllers, it’s obvious that they’re way better thаn Vive wands (there’s no brain here). Price ? once more I can’t argue there as well. My personal (subjective) opinion here is that honestly the controllers does not bother me at all. Sure I prefer better controllers, sure I prefer better res with better FOV with untetherd solution, but it will get there and as of now I’m quite happy with what I have and make use of it. What bothers me more of anything about My Vive is that the controllers are not as strong as they should be for their price. A lot of people are complaining about that after a couple of hundrends of hours the flaws are starting to kick in. Be it the trackpad, or grip buttons etc. And the price for a replacement is way too high if you ask me. Overall price of Vive or any Vive replacement is unreasonably high.

            So, now you’re probably thinking after everything I said what’s in Vive that makes it a competition for Rift?
            1. Vive tracker
            While they are not so many things out there (except for VR GUN and tenis rackets) yet, I believe there’s a big potential in it. From full body tracking to specific items that can be tracked.
            2. Base stations 2.0
            I love football (soccer), and Fifa is the only NonVR game I am still playing since I have VR. But, with four 2.0 base stations and a couple trackers, I can make a good use of much bigger play area when they come up with some nice soccer game. And once again that’s not the limit. You can think of a lot of things to make use of the bigger play area.
            3. OFFICIAL wireless solution. While there was already a wireless solution out there for both Oculus and Vive, making an official one with intel is a big step further. We all know why “official” makes a difference.

            About WMR Headsets, I found their inside-out tracking solution very interesting. As you said it’s not ready yet for the hardcore gamers, since the tech is not perfect now, but I believe that it’s the foundation for the future VR HMDs. The lower specs needed to power WMR suggests wider “pc ready” adoption at least among people interested not SO much in VR gaming.
            I was going for one of these thinking it would be very convenient to take it with me on a holiday for a month. No base stations/sensors, just the HMD and a laptop… simple.

            “THey are the ONLY ones that have been doing almost everything right in gen 1 as a product and have shown patience and high quality standards to get things right first time while everyone else jumps into a spec race.” – I already agreed with some of your positive statements about Oculus, but that sentence brings some ideas of my own …

            If Oculus had the patience to hold the release of the Rift until the touch controllers were ready as well as the 3 sensors set up with 360 degree of tracking , they could have been already far ahead HTC.

            So I had no intention getting in a argument with you, but I thought that you are not objective at all. VR is not all about gaming and is not just a res or fov or tracking, it is overall package, and each segment (mobile, standalone, PC and console) has it’s own audience, pros and cons.

          • koenshaku

            Again with the comparison of super sports cars as if you had actually owned or tried one you wouldn’t be on VR forums ranting about how great a $400 HMD is opposed to other headsets when they all give you just about the same experience more or less lol. Fanboys I swear…

          • RagnarLothbrok

            Take a deep breath my friend. Criticising someone for being fanboy, while all you did was stating your personal opinion and preferences.
            “Tracking is VITAL for VR. That was his MAIN point.” – Well … mobile headsets have sold out all (PC, PSVR) headsests combined without any form of tracking (FACT). So stating that The Rift has no competition in 1st gen. is nothing more than personal opinion. You should’ve been more specific in your comment that you were referring to PC VR HMD’s . A lot of people are saying “I want a better res” or ” I want a better FOV” or “Better controllers” or “effective wireless solution”. All these things says one thing … Everyone has different preferences , therefore there is no black and white in this market.
            Yes, I am a Vive owner, but unlike you I’m gonna be objective. I have never tried Rift, but I trust my VR buddy’s (owning both HMDs) stating that the Screen Door Effect is less in Oculus.
            About the touch controllers, it’s obvious that they’re way better thаn Vive wands (there’s no brain here). Price ? once more I can’t argue there as well. My personal (subjective) opinion here is that honestly the controllers does not bother me at all. Sure I prefer better controllers, sure I prefer better res with better FOV with untetherd solution, but it will get there and as of now I’m quite happy with what I have and make use of it. What bothers me more of anything about My Vive is that the controllers are not as strong as they should be for their price. A lot of people are complaining about that after a couple of hundrends of hours the flaws are starting to kick in. Be it the trackpad, or grip buttons etc. And the price for a replacement is way too high if you ask me. Overall price of Vive or any Vive replacement is unreasonably high.

            So, now you’re probably thinking after everything I said what’s in Vive that makes it a competition for Rift?
            1. Vive tracker
            While they are not so many things out there (except for VR GUN and tenis rackets) yet, I believe there’s a big potential in it. From full body tracking to specific items that can be tracked.
            2. Base stations 2.0
            I love football (soccer), and Fifa is the only NonVR game I am still playing since I have VR. But, with four 2.0 base stations and a couple trackers, I can make a good use of much bigger play area when they come up with some nice soccer game. And once again that’s not the limit. You can think of a lot of things to make use of the bigger play area.
            3. OFFICIAL wireless solution. While there was already a wireless solution out there for both Oculus and Vive, making an official one with intel is a big step further. We all know why “official” makes a difference.

            About WMR Headsets, I found their inside-out tracking solution very interesting. As you said it’s not ready yet for the hardcore gamers, since the tech is not perfect now, but I believe that it’s the foundation for the future VR HMDs. The lower specs needed to power WMR suggests wider “pc ready” adoption at least among people interested not SO much in VR gaming.
            I was going for one of these thinking it would be very convenient to take it with me on a holiday for a month. No base stations/sensors, just the HMD and a laptop… simple.

            “THey are the ONLY ones that have been doing almost everything right in gen 1 as a product and have shown patience and high quality standards to get things right first time while everyone else jumps into a spec race.” – I already agreed with some of your positive statements about Oculus, but that sentence brings some ideas of my own …

            If Oculus had the patience to hold the release of the Rift until the touch controllers were ready as well as the 3 sensors set up with 360 degree of tracking , they could have been already far ahead HTC.

            So I had no intention getting in a argument with you, but I thought that you are not objective at all. VR is not all about gaming and is not just a res or fov or tracking, it is overall package, and each segment (mobile, standalone, PC and console) has it’s own audience, pros and cons.

          • gothicvillas

            Thats weird. I swapped rift for vive and very happy apart from vive wands. Knuckles cant come soon enough thats for sure. In terms of room scale tracking you cant beat vive my friend .

          • Felix Boe

            “I *KNOW* the rift is the best (still)” – No
            “an utter bargain at the price it is now” – Yes

          • Cypher

            You are right. Tracking ist one of the most important things in VR but the Microsoft Tracking isn’t that bad…
            You can play absolutely any game with it. You have to provoke the tracking aborts almost to cause them. The controlers are really not the best. The best are by far the Rift and the Vive are also slightly ahead of those of the WMR.

  • koenshaku

    in other news..

    A new patch for DOOM VFR will be deployed on January 30 for PC. Here are the patch notes.

    Added Windows Mixed Reality headset support
    Added Smooth Locomotion control option
    Added Smooth Locomotion movement speed options
    Added Weapon Pitch option to adjust angle of weapon on controller
    Added option for Jump while using VR controllers with Smooth Movement on
    Added toggle for Dash when smooth movement is on
    Added Jump to Gamepad controller scheme
    Fixed an issue with discoloring seen on some HMDs

  • sokonomi

    To say this thing stands shoulder to shoulder with the two big kahunas, is a joke. Its a mobility scooter among cars.

    • Michael

      I’d like you to back up that claim.

  • Brian Brown

    Why the hell wouldn’t they release a SteamVR version along side the MR kit?

    • koenshaku

      You can use the steamVR beta which I have around 90 VR titles and I haven’t run into anything that hasn’t worked except L.A Noire which is a timed exclusive anyway.

      • Brian Brown

        That’s great. But I already have a Vive, which is part of the SteamVR ecosystem. I only want to buy an HMD with higher resolution, not an entire new system.

        • koenshaku

          I don’t understand your point steamVR supports every major HMD, but if you just want higher resolution with valve technology you would want to just wait and upgrade to the Vive pro which has the same resolution and lenses.

          • Brian Brown

            Steam VR ‘supports’ third party HMD’s, but it’s not native support. Native Steam VR is different. Right now only the Vive is out for Steam VR, but LG, Pimax, Vive 2.0 and others are coming. Everything is interchangeable in Steam VR, and I only want to upgrade my HMD, not the entire system.

  • themobiledivide

    We’ve been doing some work in multiplatform VR so I have Vive, Rift and recently purchased a Dell Visor and an Odyssey. If you are gaming there is nothing better than the Vive tracking which is flawless. The Rift has the best exclusives and seems to work more like a console with the best exclusive content. However I’m finding I have the Odyssey plugged in most of the time because it hits a sweet spot of the best visuals coupled with ease of use, I plug it into my 1060 laptop with one USB-C cable and I can take it anywhere to do demos. I can see a wireless inside out tracked headset with a couple more cameras to enable better controller tracking as the near future for the best home VR, I just can’t see any kind of strong mainstream adoption as long as external trackers are a requirement.

  • Konchu

    I have a Rift a Vive and an Odyssey. They are all good in their own ways. I personally feel Vive and Oculus need to take these serious though cause even though MR tracking is not perfect it is at least 90% there and the price is competitive. Oculus is really reasonably priced now but Vive is still premium price with Pro being more so. Of course the Odyssey is more of a device in pricing parity with Oculus and Vive aka only a 100 less than vive and similar cost to Oculus if you consider the extra camera cables etc to get room scale. But 200 dollar prices on headsets is super appealing cheap products that can push mass adoption.

    Most of the time I have no issues with MR tracking so I imagine most people will not either. Its easy to be a snob when we are used to the excellent lighthouse tracking and 3 camera constellation tracking.But I think most people of over exaggerating its weaknesses and under playing its strenths. In most games I have no issues with MR and new people are going to notice this less. People like to make a Ferrari argument but I would ask how many people drive Ferrari’s. I’m more likely to buy something fun and sporty but more reasonable like a 350Z or a Kia Stinger and Imagine I’m not alone.

    • Tsvetomir Iliev

      Lets test the tracking, lets put an MR user with gaming laptop in 10×10+ meters area vs Rift/Viver on 2×2 meters area both in multiplayer arena, I want to see the end result, the winner’s headset will be the best of them all lol

    • AJ_74

      You make a great point here. Everyone has valid praise and criticisms about all of the major HMD’s, but new users aren’t going to notice the negatives the way current HMD owners looking to switch/upgrade will.

      If anything, the Vive offers the least appealing packages to new adopters. At $200 more than the Oculus Rift it offers no significant advantage and yet has one significant disadvantage (the controllers). The Vive Pro balances the tech-side of that equation an maybe even tips the scale in its favor, but at (likely) double the cost.

      I currently own 2 Oculus Rifts and I’m really hesitant about downgrading to inferior controllers, tracking, games/apps and UI. However, the resolution is a major sticking point for me and the Odyssey largely remedies that. I’d be willing to trade the Rift’s superior controllers and front end for the Odyssey’s resolution, but not the tracking. Games like Rec Room and Eleven: Table Tennis would be unplayable for me on the Odyssey (can you imagine a golf game?)

      I fully expect a third-party solution to this problem, as it shouldn’t (in theory) be that hard to implement optional external camera/sensor support on Windows MR devices. Once this happens, or is even on the horizon, I’ll definitely be picking up an Odyssey.

      Verdict: I can’t wholeheartedly recommend any VR headset at the moment. If you’re looking to buy your first VR headset and absolutely can’t wait for the Oculus CV2 or HTC Vive Pro and Knuckles controllers (and a price drop), then I guess I’d have to recommend the Samsung Odyssey. As good as the Oculus controllers and tracking are, there’s just no denying that circa-1999 display resolution.

      The god rays don’t help either.

      • Konchu

        I have played a golf game on the Odyssey and it wasn’t terrible it was on the MR store. I really think it will come down to the implementation. When your hands leave visual range it has to fake it. On bow games it sometimes has a little bit of a snap to chin area effect which works OK and might be ignorable to VR Noobs. Golf though is about smooth fluid motions so I personally feel accelerometers can assist greatly with faking this(sorta like Wii and Playstation Move but does get to use the cameras sometimes.) I could see ping pong being tougher as you could have corrections behind your back as well as the tiny nuances of the wrist. It could do some of the faking for sure but not perfect at all.

        But I feel to fake it best it has to worth the VR devs time to do it, they can somewhat bake this into the drivers but I don’t feel would be as good as a direct implementation.

  • Graham

    I’d be really interested in trying this but I’m in the uk so not an option at moment. I hope they bring it to Europe. I don’t want base stations everywhere so inside out tracking is very appealing to me.

  • Icebeat

    How about the pain on the forehead after a prologue time or that the headset stop tracking (no the controllers) when you look down for 5 seconds or when the Z displacement is frozen because whatever reason and the controllers go crazy when used on seating position. How many batteries do you need per week? And of course your computer need a Bluetooth compatible. But yes, the screen resolution is considerable superior. It is very easy to made a review of a product that only was used for 15 minutes.