How To Stream Oculus Quest To Twitch, YouTube, Facebook, And More

by David Jagneaux • May 20th, 2019

Update 05/19/19: We’ve updated this guide with a third option at the bottom that does not require Chromecast and still provides a wireless solution. There are some drawbacks, but it’s a good overall solution. We’ve also updated the text to reflect a third option.

Original: The Oculus Quest is an impressive standalone VR headset that lets you wirelessly enter games from anywhere with full 6DOF positional tracking. One of the only drawbacks to a wireless device is that there is no screen to show what you’re doing such as with a PC monitor or a PSVR connected to a TV.

Thankfully Oculus included some options, but it isn’t quite as flexible as we would have liked. By default there are three main ways to stream Oculus Quest footage: to your phone via the Oculus app, to a Chromecast 3 and/or Chromecast Ultra device, or to your personal Facebook page.

The problem here is that your personal Facebook page doesn’t include brand pages (like a company page) and that means there’s no way to get the footage to a PC for customizing in OBS, adding webcam output, streaming to platforms other than Facebook, etc.

Don’t worry — we’ve got you covered. Basically there are three other options: you can plug the Quest into your PC, which limits mobility but is cost-effective and easy to do, you can buy everything you need to go fully wireless with Chromecast, or you can go the middle route and go wirelessly in a cost effective way with some other drawbacks. We’ll cover both ways.

So, here’s everything you need to stream Oculus Quest to Twitch, YouTube, Facebook, and any other streaming platform of your choice.

Wired Quest Streaming: What You Need

In order to stream your Quest some way other than the default three included ways out of the box, the easiest thing to do is to just plug it into your PC. Now, if you plug it in normally then it will just open up as a file location that you can drag and drop screenshots or movies to and from, but there’s a way around that.

All you really need to do this correctly are a long USB-C cord to connect the headset to your PC and a long audio auxiliary 3.5mm cable. I’d recommend at least 10 feet for each cord like the ones I linked, or longer, depending on the size of your room. For this method you’ll obviously be tethered to your PC as explained.

Then you need to go download scrcpy from GitHub. Scroll down and find the right .zip file for your OS and unpack it all into a folder somewhere on your PC.

Finally, the only other crucial part of the puzzle for this method is you’ll need access to the same Oculus mobile app that you paired your Quest with during the setup process.

Other than that you need a webcam (so people can see what you’re doing IRL and not just your point of view in the headset) and Streamlabs OBS. For OBS setup and configuration refer to my previous VR livestreaming guide — I’m not going to rehash all of that here. The same setup process applies.

Wired Quest Streaming: How To Do It

Here is what your stream could look like: [YouTube Archive]

Put Your Quest In Developer Mode

First and foremost, you need to put your Quest in Developer mode for this method to work. You can do this by making sure it’s powered on and paired to the mobile app, then go to Settings, click on the Quest, go to Advanced Setting, and toggle on Developer Mode. That’s it. You may need to register your Oculus account as a Developer account if you don’t see the option.

Plug It All In

Now you need to plug it all in to the computer. That means plug the USB-C cord into your Quest (in the same port you use to charge it) and plug the other end into your PC. Then plug the 3.5mm cord into the audio jack on your Quest and then plug the other end into your PC. I used the light blue Line-In mic port on the back of my tower, it’s usually next to the light green speaker port.

Launch Scrcpy

Just navigate to the folder you extracted everything into and launch the application. If your Quest is in developer mode and plugged in it should launch a window on your PC that shows two side-by-side vertical views, basically each lens. You’ve now got a direct feed from your Quest to your PC.

However, there is no audio.

Open Your Audio Settings

In order to get audio working you need to mess around with some settings. Your 3.5mm cord should be plugged into the Line-In source, so just open up your Sound settings, go to Recording, right click on Line-In, go to properties, click the Listen tab, and check the “Listen to this device” box.

Now, the audio from the headset should be coming out of whatever your default Playback device is in your Sound settings.

Arrange Everything In OBS

Like I said earlier, I’m not going to cover OBS settings in detail here because I did that already in this guide. Basically you just want to arrange your OBS window. For me, I cropped the scrcpy output so only my right eye is shown on the stream and made my webcam footage larger to fill up the screen (shown above).

Just make sure you have all of the audio sources arranged correctly so that the Quest audio and your microphone are both funneling through OBS. And if you are talking to anyone on Discord while playing or if they’re reading chat (like I usually do) then make sure chat audio is going into OBS as well.

Wireless Chromecast Quest Streaming: What You Need

Now the best way to stream Oculus Quest to your PC and then broadcast that to your audience on platforms like Twitch, YouTube, and Facebook, is to use this second wireless method so you can play and stream, in real-time, 100% wirelessly. You’ll do this by leveraging Quest’s ability to cast to Chromecast — although it’s still in beta, technically.

First, you’ll need a supported Chromecast device. Reportedly the Chromecast 3 and all Chromecast 3 devices will work, but the only one that I have successfully tested is the Chromecast Ultra. Buy one if you haven’t already.

Then, this is where it gets a little tricky. Chromecast cannot be plugged into a PC directly because it is an HDMI input device so it needs a screen to output footage. And since it is primarily used for content-protected footage like Netflix, HBO, Hulu, and others, you’ll need a way around that. So you’ll need to buy an HDCP Stripper / HDMI Splitter to get around those limitations. This one from OREI is the one I bought and have tested successfully.

Then you need to use a capture card to get the footage off of the Chromecast and onto your PC screen, similar to what you’d need to record high-quality footage of PSVR or any HDMI-output device. I like the El Gato HD60 S.

Now if you’re like me and you like to have friends, colleagues, etc in Discord while you’re streaming to talk to and read off/respond to comments when you’re in VR, then you need one extra step. You’ll need to get the audio from your PC wirelessly so you can hear them. You also need a high-quality and reliable wireless microphone to speak with viewers and go fully untethered. That’s why I recommend the Lucid Sound LS31 headset, but any wireless headset with a decent microphone should work fine. If you aren’t going to talk to anyone on Discord or something then you can forego the fancy headset and just plug headphones into the Quest. However, you still need to get your voice to the PC for OBS so you’ll need a different wireless microphone solution. I have not tested it, but a wireless lav system would probably work fine.

And if you want to stream your physical body as well, then you need a good webcam too with a tripod or some other kind of mount.

Wireless Chromecast Quest Streaming: How To Do It

Here is what your stream can look like: [YouTube Archive]

Make Sure Your Quest Is Ready

In order to do this streaming method, the setup process is a lot different than the first method. For starters, you need to make sure your Quest is not in developer mode. You should also verify that your Chromecast device is setup and functioning properly (test it with a YouTube video from your phone or something) before moving ahead.

Make sure all three devices (phone, Chromecast, and Quest) are setup on the same WiFi network — I recommend 5GHz instead of just 2.4GHz if possible. It’s also best to just reboot the Quest, your phone, and the Chromecast as well before getting started.

Plug Everything In

This is where this setup gets a little confusing. Basically you need to plug your Chromecast Ultra (or Gen 3 or whatever you’re gonna use) into the HDCP Stripper “In” side, then plug the “Out” of the Stripper into your capture card “In” side, then plug that into your PC. In the case of the El Gato HD60 S, that’s a USB cord.

So in my case I’ve got the Stripper and my my capture card plugged into the wall for power too.  It’s kind of a lot of cords, but it is what it is.

Cast The Quest

In the Oculus app tap the cast icon in the top right corner, select the name of your Chromecast device in the list of options, and select video quality. Normal always works great for me. Then click Cast.

Since I use the El Gato HD60 S, I have an app on my PC called “Game Capture HD” which is the window that the footage appears inside from the Chromecast input.

Remember: if it gives you errors, double check all the WiFi networks and restart all three devices and maybe even put the Quest in developer mode then switch it back off again. Doing all of that has worked for me every time to resolve any issues.

Sync Video and Audio

If you’re using a webcam then you might notice the Chromecast footage is slightly delayed versus the actual footage you see inside your headset. That’s normal. The issue is that your webcam footage is going to be a little bit ahead of what the viewer sees happening in the game. Fixing this is very simple.

In OBS right click on the webcam Video Capture Device source and click Filters. Click the plus icon and in the drop down list select “Render Delay.” When I set mine up I found it to be right around 160 milliseconds, but it may have been updated and improved since then. Just play around with some values until your webcam footage and Chromecast footage appear to be aligned.

Setup Audio (Optional)

If you’re just planning on streaming through OBS and not using your microphone or responding to comments at all then you don’t really need to worry about this step. But if you want to be able to talk to your viewers you’ll need to take things a tiny bit further. This is where a wireless microphone comes into play.

There might be a way to get the input of your Quest microphone to your PC, but I don’t know how to do that. Instead, I wear a wireless headset (the Lucid Sound one I linked earlier) that has a mic attached. It links up to my PC via a USB dongle.

Arrange Everything In OBS

Like I said earlier, I’m not going to cover OBS settings in detail here because I did that already in this guide. Basically you just want to arrange your OBS window. For me, I make the Game Capture HD window with my Chromecast footage full-screen and stick my webcam in the bottom left corner (shown above).

Just make sure you have all of the audio sources arranged correctly so that the Quest audio and your microphone are both funneling through OBS. And if you are talking to anyone on Discord while playing or if they’re reading chat (like I usually) then make sure chat audio is going into OBS as well.

Wireless Non-Chromecast Quest Streaming: What You Need

The first thing you really need to do this correctly is a USB-C cord to connect the headset to your PC for the setup. You need to plug it in to initialize the wireless connection each time.

Then you need to go download a program called Vysor. There is a free trial version with limitations but I just paid $40 for the unlocked lifetime subscription. Vysor is a program that uses a form of wireless adb. You can accomplish a similar effect manually with command line prompts and scrcpy but I prefer simplicity.

The biggest downside to this method is that it does not send the audio signal at all, just video. My way around that is a wireless mic that sits around my neck and points at the external speaker on my Quest to pick up the game audio. If I speak loudly and clearly, it picks up my voice as well too. This is the one I got. I have not tested it, but a wireless lav system would probably work fine too.

Now if you’re like me and you like to have friends, colleagues, etc in Discord while you’re streaming to talk to and read off/respond to comments when you’re in VR, then you need one extra step. You’ll need to get the audio from your PC wirelessly so you can hear them. That’s why I recommend the Lucid Sound LS31 headset, but any wireless headset should work fine. If you aren’t going to talk to anyone on Discord or something then you can forego the fancy headset. However, you still need to get your voice to the PC for OBS so you’ll need a different wireless microphone solution like the one I linked earlier.

Other than that you need a webcam (so people can see what you’re doing IRL and not just your point of view in the headset) and Streamlabs OBS. For OBS setup and configuration refer to my previous VR livestreaming guide — I’m not going to rehash all of that here. The same setup process applies.

Wireless Non-Chromecast Quest Streaming: How To Do It

Here is what your stream can look like: [YouTube Archive]

Put Your Quest In Developer Mode

First and foremost, you need to put your Quest in Developer mode for this method to work. You can do this by making sure it’s powered on and paired to the mobile app, then go to Settings, click on the Quest, go to Advanced Setting, and toggle on Developer Mode. That’s it. You may need to register your Oculus account as a Developer account if you don’t see the option.

Plug It In

Now you need to plug it in to the computer. That means plug the USB-C cord into your Quest (in the same port you use to charge it) and plug the other end into your PC. You need to do this at the beginning of your setup process every time you want to stream the Quest wirelessly.

Activate/Setup Vysor

Open up Vysor and it should automatically detect your Quest as an Android device. Now click View. From here you can tweak settings like the resolution, bitrate, and more. I try to keep everything as high as possible. The output window will be two side-by-side fisheye lenses — one of each eye. I crop out the left eye in OBS so viewers only see one eye. Now you need to click the wireless button in Vysor, wait for it to reboot the signal, then unplug the Quest. It’ll reboot the signal one more time then you’re good to go!

Sync Video and Audio

If you’re using a webcam then you might notice the Vysor footage is slightly delayed versus the actual footage you see inside your headset. That’s normal. The issue is that your webcam footage is going to be a little bit ahead of what the viewer sees happening in the game. Fixing this is very simple.

In OBS right click on the webcam Video Capture Device source and click Filters. Click the plus icon and in the drop down list select “Render Delay.” When I set mine up I found it to be right around 160 milliseconds, but it may have been updated and improved since then. Just play around with some values until your webcam footage and Vysor footage appear to be aligned.

Setup Game Audio

Since Vysor does not send an audio signal and you want to stay wireless, the only reliable way I’ve discovered that works is to just turn up the Oculus Quest speakers and point a wireless mic at the spot near your ear where the audio comes out. It isn’t the best quality, but it gets the job done. Try using the one I recommended above. This is the same mic that will pick up your voice.

Arrange Everything In OBS

Like I said earlier, I’m not going to cover OBS settings in detail here because I did that already in this guide. Basically you just want to arrange your OBS window. For me, I cropped the scrcpy output so only my right eye is shown on the stream and made my webcam footage larger to fill up the screen (shown above).

Just make sure you have all of the audio sources arranged correctly so that the Quest audio and your microphone are both funneling through OBS. And if you are talking to anyone on Discord while playing or if they’re reading chat (like I usually do) then make sure chat audio is going into OBS as well.

Note: Shout out to Zimtok for streaming a similar setup last week and inspiring the idea and shout out to Eminus for helping me setup Vysor.


That’s about it! If you have any questions about how we’ve streamed Oculus Quest or any other VR content don’t hesitate to ask here in the comments, via email, or on Twitter.

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